Hong Kong Express

Directed byWong Kar Wai | Hong Kong 1994 | 98 min
Language: Dubbed in Italian

 

THE UNEXPLAINABLE BIRTH (AND END) OF LOVE UNDER THE NEON LIGHTS OF HONG KONG.

Chungking Mansions, Hong Kong, 1994. Agent 223 can’t forget Ah Mei, the girl who left him, and gets brutalized by eating expired pineapple. He meets a mysterious woman in a blonde wig and falls in love with her. Agent 663 assiduously attends a kiosk where Ah Fei works, who falls in love with agent 663 without his realizing it.

Wong Kar-wai has made Hong Kong Express a cult object – as esoteric.

Cast:
Andy Lau, Ching Wan Lau, Ron Ng
Writer
Kar-Wai Wong
Producer(s)
Yi-kan Chan, Jeffrey Lau
Cinematography by:
Christopher Doyle, Andrew Lau
Music by:
Roel A. García, Michael Galasso, Frankie Chan
Film Editing by:
Chi-Leung Kwong, Kit-Wai Kai, William Chang

Tribute to Wong Kar-wai

Wong Kar-Wai is the most Western of the directors who have come out of the new wave of oriental cinema since the 1980s. He is an experimental director and a profound innovator of the cinematographic language: he is probably the director Godard would have been if he had been born in China thirty years later. His films maintain the classic cut of oriental culture especially in the themes of the stories, they never exaggerate with tones and do not even know what morbidity is: feelings are described and staged in a modest way, space is left for amazement but never for complacency. Think of a writer like Haruki Murakami, one of the symbolic authors of contemporary Japanese literature. His stories are universal but the way in which his writing deals with feelings refers to a distant culture, a culture in which themes such as sex, drugs and even death are dealt with in a vital way, in natural contrast to the typical heaviness of Western culture